Delhi & Agra

On Saturday, my friend Dana and I landed in New Delhi, India around noon. We took the long way – first flying fifteen hours to Guangzhou, China, before boarding a six-hour flight to the Indian capital after a two-hour layover. A direct flight to India would have been around 13 hours. There’s a silver lining…

Black History Month: The Green Grove Community

In one of my earliest vivid memories, I was four years old and crying my eyes out. It was August 1991, and I was in Lumpkin, Stewart County, Georgia. The occasion was the funeral of my maternal great-grandmother, Charlie Ellen Rutherford (nee Cullen) and I was terrified. “Am I going to die?” I wailed, as…

Stop the Violence Walk

On Saturday, February 18th, at noon, nearly a hundred people gathered at Garfield Avenue and East Second Street on the city’s East End. The gathering was cosponsored by Rabb Spann of Mount Olive Baptist Church, Tony Washington of the Crazii Dozen Auto Club, and the Plainfield Anti-Violence Coalition. Its purpose was to take a stand…

Reverend Tracey Brown to host Thursday conversation

According to a press release, Reverend Tracey Brown will host a community discussion tonight about violence and how to move forward in improving the city. There were twelve murders in Plainfield last year, and four in December – just last month. In January one person has already been killed. Other quality of life issues will be…

Councilwoman Williams reverses course, sinks local pay-to-play restrictions

Last night in Plainfield Municipal Court, the City Council voted 4-3 on first reading to reverse it’s 2011 pay-to-play restrictions on vendors. I wrote about the ordinance, and its political significance, here on Monday. As expected, Councilors Mills-Ransome, Goode, and McRae  – who had never taken a public position on pay-to-play – voted the party line by supporting MC 2017-02,…

City Council may turn back the clock on pay-to-play

In 2011, the Plainfield City Council voted to enact strong pay-to-play legislation through a set of ordinances. These set strict limits for vendors’ political contributions to local candidates who’d control awarding of contracts. The ordinance with the most teeth was MC 2011-11, which notably set a $300 local donation limit for individuals associated with vendors, and $2500 for…